Experience The Best Of Hong Kong In 72 hours

Whether you have two days or two weeks to travel, our Hong Kong city guide cover the must see sites, local food recommendations, where to stay, how much the city will cost, an example itinerary, and how to get around the city - including how to get to and from the airport. 

 A view of Hong Kong from Sky Terrace 428

A view of Hong Kong from Sky Terrace 428

With 10 million more tourists visiting Hong Kong than London each year, Hong Kong has been, and continues to be, one of the fastest growing tourist destinations of the world. Hong Kong is to Asia what New York is to North America. It is notably referred to as the Big Lychee as NYC is referred to as the Big Apple. Hong Kong is the 4th most densely populated city in the world and boasts more skyscrapers than any other city in the world. Though Hong Kong is an 'autonomous' city it operates under a "One country, Two systems" policy. Hong Kong maintains a separate political and economic system apart from China except in military defense and foreign affairs. Hong Kong retains independent executive, legislative, and judiciary powers. This city boasts tons of activities to keep any tourist busy for a few days. From the breathtaking view of the cityscape from Victoria Peak, the mesmerizing light show at the harbor every night at 8pm, the vast amount of street markets, expensive designer stores, or delectable restaurants, to the handful of hikes you can take in and around the city, Hong Kong literally has something to offer any and every kind of visitor. 


Getting To & From The Airport

There are 3 ways to get into the city from Hong Kong International Airport.

1. Take the train (This is the fastest option). This wall take you around 25-35 minutes, depending on where you need to go. You can buy the tickets from inside the terminal once you land. The train station is also connected to the terminal so you don't have to walk far to reach this option. The cost is $12 USD --> 100 HKD.

2. Take the bus (This is the cheapest option). This will take you around 40-60 minutes, depending on where you need to go. You can buy the tickets just outside Terminal 1 (this is where all the buses pick up from). The cost is $5 USD --> 40 HKD.

3. Take a taxi (This is potentially just as fast as the train but is substantially more expensive). Depending on where you need to go, depends on how fast you will get there and also determines the cost. However, there are tolls on the roads to and from the airport. So on top of your fare, you have to pay the toll fare's as well, plus additional money for each bag you put in the trunk. You are better off going with option 1 or 2.

 Causeway Bay area

Causeway Bay area


First Things First - What/Where To Eat?

Hong Kong is famous for many reasons, but near the top of that list is the food. From the mouth watering dim-sum, the fresh seafood, exquisite meats (including pigeon), to the egg tarts and fresh bakeries around the city, Hong Kong has food to please any pallet. Whether you prefer to eat at a 5 star Michelin restaurant (of which HK has the cheapest in the world), prefer the small and ancient tea cafes that serve dim-sum over tea, or want some other kind of food from a different region of the world, Hong Kong has it covered. There are more than 7 million residents in this city and more than 36 million tourists that visit each year. Needless to say, there is no kind of food you cannot find in this city. We ate our way through this city and loved every minute of it. Here are 2 restaurants and 2 specific HK dishes you must try when visiting.

  Dim Sum -   Cost around $4-6 for 4 -    Dim sum is a style of Chinese cuisine prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates. Our personal favorite is pork with cheese and soup. When you bite into it, the soup comes out and then you are left with a mouthwatering couple bits of pork, melted cheese and the steamed 'dough'.

Dim Sum - Cost around $4-6 for 4 - Dim sum is a style of Chinese cuisine prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates. Our personal favorite is pork with cheese and soup. When you bite into it, the soup comes out and then you are left with a mouthwatering couple bits of pork, melted cheese and the steamed 'dough'.

  Egg Tart -   Cost around $2-3 -  The egg tart is a kind of custard tart found in Hong Kong, Portugal, Brazil, Britain, and various Asian countries, which consists of an outer pastry crust and is filled with egg custard and baked. This is one of many dished that Hong Kong is famous for. You can find these almost anywhere. These are great for breakfast, a snack, or dessert.

Egg Tart - Cost around $2-3 - The egg tart is a kind of custard tart found in Hong Kong, Portugal, Brazil, Britain, and various Asian countries, which consists of an outer pastry crust and is filled with egg custard and baked. This is one of many dished that Hong Kong is famous for. You can find these almost anywhere. These are great for breakfast, a snack, or dessert.

  Kam Sai Nam Traditional Noodle -  This is one of our favorite restaurants in the Causeway Bay area. The food is very reasonably priced and has the best soup dim sum we have ever found. There is always a line out the door for this well hidden restaurant. Whether you are after noodles, dumplings, dim sum, meat or other local favorites, this place will not disappoint your stomach or your wallet.  -   Address: Golden Dragon Building, 41-51 Tang Lung St, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

Kam Sai Nam Traditional Noodle - This is one of our favorite restaurants in the Causeway Bay area. The food is very reasonably priced and has the best soup dim sum we have ever found. There is always a line out the door for this well hidden restaurant. Whether you are after noodles, dumplings, dim sum, meat or other local favorites, this place will not disappoint your stomach or your wallet. - Address: Golden Dragon Building, 41-51 Tang Lung St, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong.

  Bread Show -  Hong Kong has too many bakeries to choose from. This one however is our personal favorite. They have a very wide variety of pastries, and desserts that always leaving you wanting more. This bakery is very reasonably priced, feeding two of us for $5 for every breakfast. *There fudge filled chocolate pastries are to die for and there Matcha Macaroon desserts topped with raspberry and chocolate are possibly the best thing we have ever had to eat in our life.   -   Address: 396 Hennessy Rd, Bowrington, Hong Kong.

Bread Show - Hong Kong has too many bakeries to choose from. This one however is our personal favorite. They have a very wide variety of pastries, and desserts that always leaving you wanting more. This bakery is very reasonably priced, feeding two of us for $5 for every breakfast. *There fudge filled chocolate pastries are to die for and there Matcha Macaroon desserts topped with raspberry and chocolate are possibly the best thing we have ever had to eat in our life.  - Address: 396 Hennessy Rd, Bowrington, Hong Kong.


Must-See's Of Hong Kong

Hong Kong is a massive, multicultural city filled with some amazing tourist hot-spots, mouthwatering food, and hidden gems waiting to be stumbled upon. Here are the must see sights of Hong Kong that you can explore and conquer in 72 hours. There are 8 must see attractions in the city that have come to define the city's wide spread popularity. From the iconic skyscrapers, mesmerizing harbor light show, breathtaking views of the city from Victoria Peak, to the hidden side streets filled with amazing restaurants and markets - it's all broken down below. 

  The Sky Terrace 428 -     Cost $6.50 -  The Sky Terrace 428, standing at 428 meters above sea level, is the highest viewing platform in Hong Kong offering a stunning 360-degree panoramic view across the Hong Kong. This is a perfect place to get that quintessential picture of Hong Kong. The view is good any time of day, though we reckon the evening time, at sunset would offer perfect lighting.

The Sky Terrace 428 - Cost $6.50 - The Sky Terrace 428, standing at 428 meters above sea level, is the highest viewing platform in Hong Kong offering a stunning 360-degree panoramic view across the Hong Kong. This is a perfect place to get that quintessential picture of Hong Kong. The view is good any time of day, though we reckon the evening time, at sunset would offer perfect lighting.

  Symphony of Lights (SoL) at Victoria Harbour -   Free to watch  - This has been the icon of Hong Kong and Victoria Harbor since its conception ion 2004. In December 2017, The Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra recorded a new musical score for the event, and now has over 40 buildings that contribute to the myriad of searchlights, lasers, LED screens and lighting that illuminates the skyline at 8pm every night.

Symphony of Lights (SoL) at Victoria Harbour - Free to watch - This has been the icon of Hong Kong and Victoria Harbor since its conception ion 2004. In December 2017, The Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra recorded a new musical score for the event, and now has over 40 buildings that contribute to the myriad of searchlights, lasers, LED screens and lighting that illuminates the skyline at 8pm every night.

  Chungking Mansions -   Free to visit -  The building is well known as nearly the cheapest accommodation in Hong Kong. Though the building was supposed to be residential, it is made up of many independent low-budget hotels, shops and other services. The building has an unusual atmosphere and features guesthouses, curry restaurants, African bistros, clothing shops, sari stores, and foreign exchange offices. It often acts as a large gathering place for some of the ethnic minorities in Hong Kong, particularly South Asians, and Middle Eastern people. 

Chungking Mansions - Free to visit - The building is well known as nearly the cheapest accommodation in Hong Kong. Though the building was supposed to be residential, it is made up of many independent low-budget hotels, shops and other services. The building has an unusual atmosphere and features guesthouses, curry restaurants, African bistros, clothing shops, sari stores, and foreign exchange offices. It often acts as a large gathering place for some of the ethnic minorities in Hong Kong, particularly South Asians, and Middle Eastern people. 

  Junk Boat Tour -   Cost $35 -  Possibly the last Chinese junk to be painstakingly handcrafted in Hong Kong, Aqualuna was created using age old designs and traditional materials by an 80 year old local craftsman. Also known as “Cheung Po Tsai” in Cantonese, Aqualuna is named after the infamous Cheung Chau island pirate who used to terrorize the waters. Guests are able to absorb Hong Kong’s history while enjoying the intoxicating harbor and skyline views. This iconic Hong Kong experience is completed by cocktails and snacks served in the boat’s large cabin and open air decks.

Junk Boat Tour - Cost $35 - Possibly the last Chinese junk to be painstakingly handcrafted in Hong Kong, Aqualuna was created using age old designs and traditional materials by an 80 year old local craftsman. Also known as “Cheung Po Tsai” in Cantonese, Aqualuna is named after the infamous Cheung Chau island pirate who used to terrorize the waters. Guests are able to absorb Hong Kong’s history while enjoying the intoxicating harbor and skyline views. This iconic Hong Kong experience is completed by cocktails and snacks served in the boat’s large cabin and open air decks.

  Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car   -   Cost $16 -  The cable car journey offers a 25-minute aerial alternative to the current one-hour journey by Tung Chung Rd, allowing visitors to glide across Chung Bay and up to Lantau Island towards Ngong Ping Plateau. From the cable car you will get a view of the city, bay, big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery. 

Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car - Cost $16 - The cable car journey offers a 25-minute aerial alternative to the current one-hour journey by Tung Chung Rd, allowing visitors to glide across Chung Bay and up to Lantau Island towards Ngong Ping Plateau. From the cable car you will get a view of the city, bay, big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery. 

  The Big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery -  The remote Po Lin Monastery is one of Hong Kong’s most important Buddhist sanctums and has been dubbed ‘the Buddhist World in the South’. Hidden away by lush mountains, it became a popular tourist attraction when the Buddha statue was erected in 1993. The Buddha is the largest sitting Buddha in the world and sits 34 metres high,  facing north to look over the Chinese people.

The Big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery - The remote Po Lin Monastery is one of Hong Kong’s most important Buddhist sanctums and has been dubbed ‘the Buddhist World in the South’. Hidden away by lush mountains, it became a popular tourist attraction when the Buddha statue was erected in 1993. The Buddha is the largest sitting Buddha in the world and sits 34 metres high,  facing north to look over the Chinese people.

  Tai O  - Also known as the "Venice of Hong Kong", Tai O is a tourist spot for both foreigners and residents of other parts of Hong Kong. The p ang uks , a kind of stilt house, built right over the waterway are still quite scenic. For a small fee, some residents will take tourists out on their boats along the river and for short jaunts into the sea

Tai O - Also known as the "Venice of Hong Kong", Tai O is a tourist spot for both foreigners and residents of other parts of Hong Kong. The pang uks, a kind of stilt house, built right over the waterway are still quite scenic. For a small fee, some residents will take tourists out on their boats along the river and for short jaunts into the sea

  Hong Kong’s Markets  - There are more than 10 markets in HK, all famous for the fashionable and cheap clothing, accessories, jewellery, and electronics. In Hong Kong, there really is a market for every style and taste. Kowloon is home to many of Hong Kong’s finest markets although it’s fair to say that markets are found all over Hong Kong. Find out more about each market  here . 

Hong Kong’s Markets - There are more than 10 markets in HK, all famous for the fashionable and cheap clothing, accessories, jewellery, and electronics. In Hong Kong, there really is a market for every style and taste. Kowloon is home to many of Hong Kong’s finest markets although it’s fair to say that markets are found all over Hong Kong. Find out more about each market here


Exploring Hong Kong On Public Transportation

Hong Kong is a well structured and connected city. Thus their public transportation is easy to use and affordable. When sightseeing in Hong Kong, we recommend hopping on any of the options below to reach your desired destination. All options are reasonably affordable (except maybe for taxi's) and will take you anywhere in the city. 

  The Octopus card  is the best way to use public transportation in Hong Kong. Not only will it save you money on your fares, for any mode of public transportation i.e. buses, minibuses, ferries, trams and on a few taxis equipped with Octopus readers, it also allows users the ability to pay for goods and services in shops, department stores, supermarkets, fast food restaurants and retail outlets. You can refill your Octopus card with cash at any 7/11 or MTR terminal.

The Octopus card is the best way to use public transportation in Hong Kong. Not only will it save you money on your fares, for any mode of public transportation i.e. buses, minibuses, ferries, trams and on a few taxis equipped with Octopus readers, it also allows users the ability to pay for goods and services in shops, department stores, supermarkets, fast food restaurants and retail outlets. You can refill your Octopus card with cash at any 7/11 or MTR terminal.

Benefits of using Octopus:
- There is no need to spend time buying a single journey ticket at Ticket Issuing Machines, or counting the exact amount of coins.
- The MTR fares using Octopus are usually cheaper than single journey tickets.
- Apart from collecting fares on public transport, it can be used as a payment method in retail and fast food outlets.
- Passengers traveling to/from the airport can enjoy a 50% discount on the return journey on the same day.
How Does It Work:                                                              Swipe/touch the card over the Octopus reader. The amount taken as well as the remaining value will be shown after each transaction, so you know when it is time to top up the card.
- MTR (subway): Swipe the card at the entrance barrier and once at the exit barrier (destination station).
- Ferry: Swipe the card at the entrance barrier.
- Bus: Swipe the card when you get on.
- Trams: Swipe the card when you get off.

  Tram's  -  Cost: $2.30 -  The tram is the cheapest mode of public transport on the island. The comparatively affordable fare is highlighted by Hong Kong Tramways' advertising slogan: "Hop on 1. $2.3. Tram so easy!"  The tram system in Hong Kong and one of the earliest forms of public transport, is also a major tourist attraction and one of the most environmentally friendly ways of travelling in Hong Kong. The trams run on a double track tramline built parallel to the northern coastline. There are 7 tram termini located along the tram line. See the tram routes and more  here . Unlike most other forms of public transport in Hong Kong, fare charged is uniform regardless of the distance traveled. Passengers pay upon exiting by exact fare, or by the Octopus Card.

Tram'sCost: $2.30 - The tram is the cheapest mode of public transport on the island. The comparatively affordable fare is highlighted by Hong Kong Tramways' advertising slogan: "Hop on 1. $2.3. Tram so easy!"  The tram system in Hong Kong and one of the earliest forms of public transport, is also a major tourist attraction and one of the most environmentally friendly ways of travelling in Hong Kong. The trams run on a double track tramline built parallel to the northern coastline. There are 7 tram termini located along the tram line. See the tram routes and more here. Unlike most other forms of public transport in Hong Kong, fare charged is uniform regardless of the distance traveled. Passengers pay upon exiting by exact fare, or by the Octopus Card.

  The public light bus -  These serve areas that standard Hong Kong bus lines cannot reach efficiently. Minibuses carry a maximum of 19 seated passengers and are typically faster and more efficient due to their small size, limited carrying capacity, and frequency and diverse range of routes.  There are 2 kinds of minibuses  that operate in the city:  Green minibuses  operate a scheduled service, with fixed routes and fixed fares. The exact fare must be tendered, or payment can be made by Octopus card.  Red minibuses  are a kind of share taxi, which run a non-scheduled service and may operate anywhere in the city. Only a few of these red minibuses are equipped to accept payment by Octopus card. Fares and timetables are not regulated by the Government.

The public light bus - These serve areas that standard Hong Kong bus lines cannot reach efficiently. Minibuses carry a maximum of 19 seated passengers and are typically faster and more efficient due to their small size, limited carrying capacity, and frequency and diverse range of routes. There are 2 kinds of minibuses that operate in the city: Green minibuses operate a scheduled service, with fixed routes and fixed fares. The exact fare must be tendered, or payment can be made by Octopus card. Red minibuses are a kind of share taxi, which run a non-scheduled service and may operate anywhere in the city. Only a few of these red minibuses are equipped to accept payment by Octopus card. Fares and timetables are not regulated by the Government.

  Double-Decker Bus  - The bus system in Hong Kong is very easy to use. Final destinations are shown on the front of the buses both in English and Chinese. The bus routes cover almost all of Hong Kong except some outlying islands. Buses in Hong Kong are self-service ticketing and change is not given. Generally, ticket fare is displayed on information boards at the bus stops. Passengers should ensure they are carrying the correct change before boarding or using an Octopus Card to pay the ticket fare. Hong Kong boasts many double-decker buses. You can sit near the front on the top deck, catch all the excitement and feel the pulse of city life.

Double-Decker Bus - The bus system in Hong Kong is very easy to use. Final destinations are shown on the front of the buses both in English and Chinese. The bus routes cover almost all of Hong Kong except some outlying islands. Buses in Hong Kong are self-service ticketing and change is not given. Generally, ticket fare is displayed on information boards at the bus stops. Passengers should ensure they are carrying the correct change before boarding or using an Octopus Card to pay the ticket fare. Hong Kong boasts many double-decker buses. You can sit near the front on the top deck, catch all the excitement and feel the pulse of city life.

Taxi's -  Fares are charged according to distance traveled and waiting time, measured by a meter on board. There is a starting fare, and there are surcharges for luggage and tolled tunnels and bridges, as well as surcharges for telephone-arranged ordering.There are 3 kinds of taxi's that operate within Hong Kong. The Red taxis have the highest fares among all, and serve all areas of New Territories, Kowloon and Hong Kong Island. The green taxis, the second most expensive, serve only parts of the New Territories. The Blue taxis run in most of Lantau Island. A fare table must be displayed clearly inside the taxi, by law.


Where We Stay

There are tons of accommodation options in Hong Kong, from hostels, Airbnb, bed & breakfasts, or many five-star hotels.

We choose to stay at Yesinn Backpackers Hostel in Causeway Bay - off of Hennessy Road.  "Yesinn @Causeway Bay is a new hostel located near Causeway Bay subway station in central Hong Kong, across the road from the bus from the airport. Opened in 2012, this hostel has some great extras such as a massage chair, free coffee and tea and personal reading lights. One Hostelworld traveller praised the hostel for its 'clean room, comfortable beds, modern and very clean bathroom, expedient and clean kitchen with a good choice of music, helpful and friendly staff [and its] good location'. We like their two roof terraces." ($25/night for a 9 bed mixed dorm).

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Travel Tips & Helpful Hints

Do I need a visa? Nationals of about 170 countries and territories may visit Hong Kong without a visa/entry permit for a period ranging from 7 days to 180 days. For more information on visa/entry permit requirements refer to the Visit Visa / Entry Permit Requirements for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

What is the power voltage? Hong Kong uses the same power plug as in the United Kingdom. The voltage is 220v whereas the US is 110V - so your devices may get a little warm while charging.

What about smoking weed or drinking in the streets? Though people may smoke it, weed is illegal and carries a hefty fine. As far as drinking goes, it is permissible to drink in public but is illegal to be publicly intoxicated...so pace yourself.

Is it possible for me to explore the rest of China while i'm here? Unless you have a visa for China, it is not possible to cross the border. However, getting a Chinese visa in HK is substantially cheaper than it is anywhere else in the world. In Hong Kong a visa for China will cost you around $25 USD whereas in the USA it will cost you well over $130 USD. Find out more information about visiting China from HK here

Can I gamble in Macau? Most definitely. Macau is to China as Las Vegas is to the USA or Monte Carlo is to Europe. It is legal for anyone to gamble here (as long as you are 21 or older) but your winnings will be taxed at 35%. 

Is the pollution as bad in Hong Kong as it is in the rest of China? Air pollution in HK is considered a serious problem. Visibility is less than eight kilometers for 30 per cent of the year. Cases of asthma and bronchial infections have soared in recent years due to reduced air quality. Our tip: bring (or buy once there) a medical mask to wear when walking around the city. Tons of people wear them so you won't stand out.

What is the currency and its value? The currency used in Hong Kong is called the Hong Kong Dollar (HKD). The current value (at the time writing) is $7.80 HKD = $1 USD.

 Near Chungking Mansions

Near Chungking Mansions


72 hours in Hong Kong Example Itinerary:

Day One:

Start your first day by walking through the city until you find something delicious to eat.

Head to a 7/11 and buy an Octopus card. Make sure you put money on it after you buy it. Hop on a trolley (upper deck) and start to explore the city. Get off anywhere that looks interesting. Explore.

Once you have seen a bit of the city via trolley, take a subway line to the Tsim Sha Tsui stop and make your way to Chungking Mansions. Explore the inside market and grab a cheap lunch from inside. Head out of the market and explore the surrounding area. Head to the Star Ferry Pier only a few blocks down the road.

Once you are at the Star Ferry Pier, pay for a ferry ride across the harbor ($0.25). This will take you back to Hong Kong Island, where chances are is the area you are staying. This ride is quick but offers a great view of the city and awesome photo opportunities. 

Around 6pm, head back to your hotel or hostel and grab your jacket. Make your way to a bus stop that services bus 15 to Victoria Peak. Get off at the stop for the Peak Trolley (or you can take the bus all the way to the top). If you get off for the trolley, you will have a beautiful ride to the top full of gorgeous views and picture opportunities of the city. Once you're at the top, buy a ticket for the Sky Terrace 428 to see the city light up over the harbor during sunset.

Take the same route back to your hotel or hostel. Grab dinner at any of the restaurants that catch your eye, as they are all probably good.

Day Two:

Grab something to eat and head to an MTR station. 

Take the subway to Lantau island to spend the day exploring the 3 amazing sights located here.

Once on Lantau Island, head to the Big Buddha and Po Lin Monastery. Spend a couple hours exploring the beauty that surrounds these iconic destinations. 

Head to the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car to get a great aerial view of the sights you were just walking around. ($16 each way).

Grab some lunch.

Head to Tai O fishing village which is located about 30 minutes away by bus from the Buddha. We hear this is an amazing place that offers magical photos and chances to ride down the river with the locals for a tour of the town and maybe even see pink Chinese dolphins. We heard you can spend hours exploring this area.

Take the journey back to your hotel or hostel.

You're probably exhausted. Grab some dinner and maybe a few beers. Find a good spot to people watch before heading off to bed.

Day Three:

Don't forget breakfast.

Day 2 was quite busy and you may get a later start to the day than the previous two. Once you have had breakfast, head to Victoria Park for a nice, relaxing stroll. Here you will find fountains, tennis courts, a boat racing track, library, swimming pools, and more. This is the Central or Hyde Park of Hong Kong. There are some cool views of the city from here too.

Explore some of the cool areas of the city surrounding the park. Bring your camera.

Check out some of the local street markets for some cool souvenirs and for some local lunch. There are 10 famous markets located in the city, and you could spend hours exploring just a handful of them.

At around 6:30, head to the Star Ferry Pier. Located just on the opposite side of the street there is a clocktower. Behind the clock tower is permanent seating where visitors can watch the Symphony of Lights for free. The show is amazing and is an icon of the city. The show is at 8pm every night and lasts around 15 minutes. Make sure to get your seat an hour early as it fills up fast. Feel free to bring some beers.

If you have not had dim sum yet, then now is the time. Grab some dinner and enjoy your last few hours in the city. Take a walk, have some beers or ride the trolley's until they stop service at 12am.

Head back to your hotel or hostel and grab a good nights rest before your flight.

 Around the Times Square area

Around the Times Square area


So What's It Going To Cost?

Here is how much we spent, and what we spent it on, in 72 hours. 

Food: Breakfast: We spent an average of $3 USD each morning at local bakeries. 
Lunch: We spent an average of $7 USD each day at local restaurants; usually ordering sandwiches, or sushi.  
Dinner: We spent an average of $10 USD each evening going to the "nice" restaurants that caught our eye during the day. We had nice sushi, amazing dim sum and more sushi. 
Total for Food = $20 USD each/per day.

Beer: We bought beer from 7/11 instead of the bars because it was way cheaper. Seriously, $15 USD for a beer at a bar or $2 for a beer from the convenient store? 
Total for Beer = $6 USD each/per day.

Accommodation: Yesinn Backpackers Hostel is one of the cheapest in town.
For 2 people to stay 3 nights, we spent $150 total.

Transportation (Including getting to and from the airport): We purchased the Octopus cards (which cost $5 each) and we put $20 each onto our cards. This lasted us the entire 72 hours...and we took a lot of public transportation.
Total for Transportation = $25 USD each.

Activities: Admission ticket to go to the top of Sky Terrace 428 for $6.50 each. Ferry across the harbor for $.025 each. Besides that, we walked around a bunch and found the free activities to do: like exploring a local market and cultural festival, watching the Symphony of Lights from land vs. a boat, exploring Victoria Park, and taking the trolley's until something looked cool and we got off to explore. Unfortunately we were not able to visit the Big Buddha or take the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car. (If you are going to the Big Buddha or Cable Car you will need  to add more money to your Octopus card than our budget shows,as we were not able to go. The trip costs around HK $50 each way to get there). 
Total for Activities = $6.75 USD each (total).

So, What Did We Spend In 72 Hours?

$369.50 USD for 2 people. That's about $62 USD per person, per day.
Not too bad for one the world's most expensive cities.

Where's Your Money Going?


A Few More Pics From The Lens Of SMP

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Enjoy Your Trip!


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